101 Hotel & Reykjavik Golf
Iceland, West Iceland, Reykjanes, Reykjavik

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The Resort
The Resort

The Resort

One of Reykjavik's trendiest venues, the 101 hotel is a sleek boutique hotel located on a busy corner of downtown Reykjavik, next to the Opera House and the House of Culture. A member of Design Hotels International, the hotel takes its name from the city centre postal code 101. Housed in the former headquarters of the Social Democratic Party, built in the 1930's, the grey exterior belies the striking interior, where sleek design and a stylish sense of comfort prevail. 

101 hotel is the work of owner Ingibjorg Palmadottir. This hip place has a minimalist design with a monochromatic palette of volcanic black and greys, reflecting the Icelandic landscape, yet coldness is avoided by the use of warm American oak flooring stretching across the building's entire expanse.  The views from the top floors over the city, its bay and Mount Esja under the midnight sun are eerie and breathtaking. 101 hotel also prides itself on its art collection which holds many of the leading contemporary artists in Iceland.

If you are planning a trip to Iceland in the summertime, you may want to make use of the twenty-four hour daylight and play golf all night! There are nine golf courses within a radius of fifteen kilometres around town, displaying some of the most dramatic scenery in the world. The grande dame of Icelandic golf clubs, Reykjavik Golf Club was founded in 1934 and is by far the largest golf facility in Iceland. The club operates two eighteen hole golf courses and a nine hole course. The most famous, the Grafarholt course, sprawls over heaving volcanic grounds on the eastern outskirts of the capital.

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Hotel 101
Hotel 101

Hotel 101

101 hotel is the work of owner Ingibjorg Palmadottir. This hip place has a minimalist design with a monochromatic palette of volcanic black and greys, reflecting the Icelandic landscape, yet coldness is avoided by the use of warm American oak flooring stretching across the building's entire expanse.  The views from the top floors over the city, its bay and Mount Esja under the midnight sun are eerie and breathtaking. 101 hotel also prides itself on its art collection which holds many of the leading contemporary artists in Iceland.

101 hotel's 38 rooms are all light, airy and furnished with the minimum necessary items - a large bed, comfortable chairs, a handy working desk and a lot of empty space. They are also fitted with the latest technology, including floor heating and large screen television sets with DVD and WiFi. Rather than being separated, the bedrooms flow into the open plan bathrooms, fitted with oak floors and large walk-in showers with huge showerheads, some with free standing tubs.

101 hotel has a cosy lounge with a fireplace and leather armchairs, a billiard room, two function rooms and a spa with a gym, a jacuzzi, a sauna and a plunge pool. The hotel's beating heart is the casual "101 restaurant", a narrow bar with high walls and a glass ceiling that let the midnight sun flood in. It looks up onto an art installation by the owner's sister. One of the trendiest places in town, the restaurant offers a full menu combining modern Icelandic and international cuisine. There are also several gourmet dining venues within walking distance of 101 hotel.

Accommodation

Boutique hotel afilliated to Design Hotels International • 38 Rooms & Suites • All rooms with oak floors and underfloor heating, CD/DVD player, satellite TV, Bose iPod sounddock, phone with voicemail, WiFi wireless Internet, safe, minibar • Bathrooms with walk-in showers, suites with free standing bathtubs

Amenities

Room service • Laundry/Valet service • 101 restaurant (full menu and bar service) • Gourmet dining within walking distance • Lobby with fireplace • Billiard room • Fitness room with jacuzzi, steam bath and plunge pool • Massages • Business: Board room for 10-12 people and Business services

Reykjavik Golf Club
Reykjavik Golf Club

Reykjavik Golf Club

The grande dame of Icelandic golf clubs, Reykjavik was founded in 1934 and is by far the largest golf facility in Iceland. Reykjavik Golf Club operates two eighteen hole golf courses and a nine hole course. The most famous, the Grafarholt course, sprawls over heaving volcanic grounds on the eastern outskirts of the capital, while the new Korpfulsstadir course enjoy a friendlier seaside setting, a short distance south of the capital. The Club is recognised as Iceland's premier championship venue and has hosted many European and Scandinavian tournaments. Reykjavik is also a joint venue of the Iceland Open, held each year in June during the Summer Solstice and teeing off at midnight!

Established in 1934, Reykjavik is the oldest club in the country. The club was originally given the name of Golf Club Iceland, as at that time it was the only one in the country and the Icelandic golf federation was still to be born. As more clubs opened, such as Akureyri in 1935 and Westman Islands in 1938, the club's name was changed to Reykjavik Golf Club. Today, there are over fifty clubs affiliated to the Golf Union of Iceland, established in 1942, and the country boasts the world's highest ratio of golf courses per inhabitant. Reykjavik is by far the largest golf club in Iceland, with its 45 holes of golf and 1.900 members.

Although opened in 1963, Reykjavik's Grafarholt course is still the oldest eighteen hole course in Iceland. The course was designed by reputed Swedish architect Niels Skjold, who also laid out the links at Keflavik Golf Club. Niels skilfully used the existing rugged and varied landscape to produce arguably the toughest championship course in the country. The very idea of building a golf course at Grafarholt shows a great deal of optimism and courage from the founders. When the construction works began, the terrain was quite barren, mostly lava flow and rocks not much receptive to any growth. Thus, the task of building a golf course on such inhospitable land proved to be extremely difficult.  

• Grafarholt Old Course

Niels Skjold (1963) 18 holes - 6,597 yds - Par 71

On the north eastern outskirts of the capital, the Grafarholt Golf Course opened in 1963, which makes it the oldest 18 hole course in Iceland. The course was laid out by reputed Swedish architect Niels Skjold, who also designed the reputed links at Keflavik Golf Club. Niels skilfully used the existing rugged and varied landscape to produce arguably the toughest championship course in the country.

Grafarholt offers a great variety of holes, each with its own distinctive character. Extending over high rolling grounds, the course enjoys beautiful vistas of the city of Reykjavik and across the Faxa Bay to Mount Esja. Its main feature is the natural rough comprised of rocks and ancient lava stones. In Iceland, volcanic rocks play the same imposing role as trees elsewhere, the island being nearly completely barren. The greens may not be as smooth as those under warmer latitudes but they are firm and always in good shape.  

• Korpulfsstadir New Course

Hannes Thorsteinsson (1993) 18 holes - 6,565 yds - Par 71

In the southern outskirts of the capital, the Korpfulsstadir Golf Course was designed in 1993 by Hannes Thorsteinsson, the first Icelandic member of the British Institute of Golf Course Architects, before its merger with the European Society of Golf Course Architects in 2000. Korpfulsstadir is of a kinder nature than her eldest sister course, Grafarholt. 

The architect here let the land dictate the flow of the course to the best result.  Not two holes are alike and the variety in both course design and natural scenery make this course a memorable layout. This is a visually very appealing layout with a scenic difference between the front and back nines. The front nine curves around the Korpa River, while the back nine head towards the sea and the Faxa Bay.

 


Golf in Reykjavik

Golf in Reykjavik

Golf can be played all year round in Iceland, and if you are planning a trip to Iceland in the summertime, you may want to make use of the twenty-four hour daylight and play golf all night. There are nine golf courses within a radius of fifteen kilometres around town, displaying some of the most dramatic scenery in the world.

Keilir Golf Club

With its illustrious neighbour, Reykjavik Golf Club, Keilir is also the joint venue of the Amstel Light Iceland Open. Held annually since 2002 at both club, the tournament takes place in June, during the Summer Solstice, and tees off at midnight ! The Iceland Open is an international event open to any player with an official handicap certificate of 36 - players with no handicap are also welcome and will play in their own category. This Stableford competition is played over two rounds of 18 holes each day - one optional practice round and one competition round, one day at Reykjavik Golf Club (Grafarholt course) and the other day at Keilir Golf Club.

• Championship Course

Hannes Thorsteinsson (1967) 18 Holes - 6,329 yds - Par 71

One of Iceland's leading clubs, Keilir Golf Club takes its name from the Keilir mountain, an extinct volcano on the Reykjanes peninsula. Established in 1967, the original nine hole links course was extended to a full eighteen hole with the addition of nine holes in 1994, now the front nine, built in thirty hectares of adjoining lava field. Keilir's Hvaleyrarvollur course was designed by Hannes Thorsteinsson, the first Icelandic member of the British Institute of Golf Course Architects, who merged with the European Society of Golf Course Architects in 2000. The course is divided into two distinctive halves: the "new" lava course on the outward nine, and the "old" links course on the homeward nine, each challenging in their own right. 

In addition, the club boasts the best practice range in the Reykjavik area, where people can hit balls under a roof to many different targets. A beautiful new club house was built in 1993 overlooking the course and the Atlantic Ocean. On a clear day, Keilir enjoys breathtaking views across the Faxa Bay to the Snaefellsnes Peninsula and the Snaefells Glacier, where Jules Verne situated his "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" novel. 

GKG Gardabaer & Kopavogs

GKG is part of the trio of fine golf clubs in the Reykjavik formed by the vintage Reykjavik Golf Club, Keilir Golf Club and GKG Gardabaer & Kopavogs. GKG features a championship golf course laid out in 1996, venue each year of the national final of the BMW Golf Cup International, the largest amateur tournament in the world. 

• Vifilsstadavollur Course

Architect unknown (1996) 18 holes - 5,850 yds - Par 70

The Vifilsstadavollur championship course extends over rolling open land made of green pastures and ancient lava flows. On a clear day, players will enjoy breathtaking views across the Faxa Bay to the Snaefellsnes Peninsula and the Snaefells Glacier, where Jules Verne situated his "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" novel, as well as to the Mt. Esja, the capital Reykjavik, the neighbouring town of Hafnarfjordur and the mountains of the Reykjanes Peninsula to the south.

The course takes its name from the land where it is sited. The site of Gardabaer has been inhabited since Iceland was first settled in the 9th century. The Book of Settlement tells about two farms on the site, Vifilsstadir and Skulastatdir. The former was named after Vifil, who was a servant of Ingolfur Arnarson, the first settler of Iceland. Ingolfur, a Norwegian Viking, granted Vifil his freedom and he made his home at Vifilsstadir.

Keflavik Sudurnes Golf Club

Sudurnes Golf Club, or Keflavik as it is known internationally, is situated on the coast five minutes from Keflavik International Airport, between the harbour towns of Keflavik and Gardur. The club takes its name in English from the nearby town of Keflavik and in Icelandic from the Sudurnesja Peninsula, part of the larger Reykjanes Peninsula extending west of the capital, Reykjavik. Founded in 1964, Keflavik Golf Club has grown in both members and popularity to become one of the country's leading

• Championship Course

Niels Skjold (1964/1986) 18 holes - 6,523 yds - Par 72

The reputed Keflavik  Golf Club is situated on the shores of the Sudurnes peninsula, 5 min. from Keflavik International Airport. The original nine hole course at Keflavik was extended to a eighteen holes in 1986 by reputed Swedish architect Niels Skjold to form the Holmsvollur course. Holmsvollur is an internationally renowned championship course playing over 6,500 yards from the back tees. It is is not a proper links, the ground being volcanic and not sandy, but Holmsvollur has all the other characteristics of traditional links courses, including the constant breeze and the occasional gale force wind. This emerald haven is framed by jet-black lava rocks splashed with white surf. Wide open without a tree in site, the course wanders over heaving grounds beside the sea in truly breathtaking fashion. Lush and green fairways, fast greens on spit of land jutting out into the sea and an innovative design make playing Keflavik an absolute must when in Iceland.

Reykjavik & Reykjanes Peninsula

Reykjavik & Reykjanes Peninsula

Iceland is the most sparsely populated country in Europe with an average of three inhabitants per square km. Iceland is a refreshingly unconventional destination. The Icelandic nature is unspoiled, exotic and mystical with its spouting geysers, active volcanoes, tumbling waterfalls, towering mountains, vast lava plains and magical lakes. Iceland's fjords, glaciers and highland plains present visitors with some of the most beautiful and enchanting places they will ever see, as well as a rare feeling of utter tranquility.

Reykjavík has been described as a young and daring city that is characterised by strong contrasts. Reykjavík sometimes feels like a cosmopolitan capital and a tiny seaside village - all wrapped up in one. But Reykjavík has the best of both worlds; the qualities of a modern, forward-looking society complemented by a close connection to Iceland's beautiful and unspoilt nature. Reykjavik's legendary nightlife is bolstered by plentiful cultural and social happenings in addition to an abundance of first-class restaurants.

The world's northernmost capital, Reykjavik is Iceland's biggest town, Greater Reykjavik accounting for half of the country population. Although the outskirts bristle with modern buildings, the old town, extending between the charming Lake Tjornin and the harbour, has retained its Scandinavian charm with low, brightly coloured wooden house. The city is dominated by the breast shaped glass dome of the power station known as Pearlan (The Pearl) and the Hallsgrimskirka cathedral, both offering magnificent panoramic views over the city and the bay. 

Framed by the majestic Mount Esja, Reykjavik extends on the south eastern shores of the Faxa Bay, surrounded by a lunar volcanic netherworld dotted with numerous geothermal springs, which provide almost all the heating and hot water in the city. Reykjavik was founded in 874 by the Norseman Ingolfur Amarson, who gave the town its name after seeing the clouds of steam billowing from the hot springs - "Reykjavik" means literally "smokey bay". The city is washed by the Gulf Stream, providing for a much milder climate than its northerly situation would suggest. Still, winters are long and bleak, with just a few hours of sunshine, although the spectacular Aurora Borealis makes up for this. Summer, by contrast, brings the famed midnight sun and allow for round the clock outdoor activities.

In October 1986, Reykjavik jumped into the world spotlights, hosting the East-West summit between Soviet and American leaders, Mikhail Gobartchev and Ronald Reagan, ending the Cold War. Since then, the city has emerged as an unlikely tourist destination. Although its exciting nightlife and cafe culture has been lately its major publicity, the city has a wealth of cultural facilities, six geothermal spas and countless trip opportunities into the stunning hinterland. Reykjavik is ideally situated between the Reykjanes Peninsula to the west and the famous "Golden Circle", which groups the major natural attractions of the eastern hinterland.

 

Reykjavik Tourist Card

One, two and three day cards • Free admission to museums, art galleries and Reykjavik's 6 thermal pools • Unlimited travel on Greater Reykjavik public transports • Discount on day tours and the "Golden Circle" tour

Golden Circle Tour

Thingvellir National Park (UNESCO World Heritage Site) • Geysir (The original geyser) • Gullfoss (Golden Falls) • Kerid Crater

Reykjanes Peninsula

Blue Lagoon Geothermal Spa (Iceland's#1 attraction) • Reykjanesfolkvangur National Park & Kleifarvatn Lake

Address & Contact

Hotel 101

Hverfisgata 10

101 Reykjavik

Iceland

 

Location

District 101 in downtown Reykjavik, next to the Opera House 

Airports

Reykjavik Domestic Airport (REK), 5 km. 

Keflavik International Airport (KEF), 55 km.

Season

All year (Golf & Hotel)

Climate

Northern Atlantic with wet, rather mild winters for these northern latitudes and cool summers • 4 hours of daylight in winter / 24 hours of daylight during the summer solstice (June-July)