Portmarnock Hotel & Golf Links
Ireland, Dublin, Dublin, Portmarnock

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The Resort
The Resort

The Resort

On the scenic Portmarnock peninsula just north of Dublin, two extraordinary yet contrasting golf courses share a classic links setting, once part of the Old Jameson Estate: the vintage Portmarnock Golf Club and the new Portmarnock Hotel & Golf Links. The two layouts run through wild dunes on the oceanside, with the backdrop of Ireland's Eye, the monolithic island landmark in Dublin's Bay.

The Portmarnock Hotel & Golf Links is a vintage blend of the old and new. Originally the home of the Jameson family, of Irish whiskey fame, the house has been tastefully transformed into a deluxe hotel while the surrounding land of the estate has been moulded into a superb golf links at the hand of Bernhard Langer, the famous German player, Masters' champion and 2004 Ryder Cup Captain. 

The peninsula of Portmarnock is about two miles long and covers some 500 acres. It is links land at its best, with low sand dunes, small green hollows and long valleys. This ideal golfing terrain has been first used for the game as early as 1858 by the Jameson's, their private golf course running south from their home, now the Portmarnock Hotel, to the site of the present 15th green at Portmarnock Golf Club. It was followed in 1894 by George Ross & W.C. Pickeman layout at Portmarnock Golf Club and more recently the Links at Portmarnock, in 1995.

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Portmarnock Hotel
Portmarnock Hotel

Portmarnock Hotel

Accommodation is distributed between the Main House, with period furnished suites, and the Modern Wing, with spacious and attractively decorated rooms. All guestrooms in both wings overlook either the sea or the golf course and were equipped to superior standards. Fitness facilities at the resort include a gymnasium, sauna, massage and beauty salon. Guests can also take a pleasant stroll along the coastal path to the lively and picturesque village of Malahide.

Distinguished with three AA Rosettes, the award-winning Osborne Restaurant serves a blend of modern Irish and international cuisine along with a superb selection of wines. In a more casual setting, the Links Restaurant offers excellent dining in the relax setting of the clubhouse. The main house also hosts the oak-panelled Jameson Bar and the Cocktail Lounge, a favourite meeting place for drinks, light meals and high tea, reminiscent of the gracious living era of the Jameson House.

AA 4 Red Stars - 19th. century mansion and modern seaside golf resort 

Accommodation

99 Rooms & Suites • Period decorated suites in the 19th C Main House • Spacious and elegant rooms in the Modern Wing • All rooms with Cable TV with sports/movie channels, trouser press, two phones, tea/coffee making facilities • En-suite bathrooms with bath and shower, hair dryer and customised bath accessories • Executive Rooms with third telephone, Stereo CD player, Video player and Minibar • Nightly turndown service

Amenities

24 Hour room service • Laundry/Valet service • Concierge desk • Valet parking

Dining

Osborne Restaurant (AA 3 Rosettes) • Links Bar & Restaurant (Clubhouse) • Jameson's Bar • Cocktail Lounge

Leisure

Gymnasium, sauna and massage • Beauty salon • Walled gardens • Beach

Business

3 Meeting rooms accommodation from 2 to 350 persons

Portmarnock Golf Links & Golf Club
Portmarnock Golf Links & Golf Club

Portmarnock Golf Links & Golf Club

On the scenic Portmarnock peninsula just north of Dublin, two extraordinary yet contrasting golf courses share a classic links setting, once part of the Old Jameson Estate: the vintage Portmarnock Golf Club and the new Portmarnock Hotel & Golf Links. The two layouts run through wild dunes on the oceanside, with the backdrop of Ireland's Eye, the monolithic island landmark in Dublin's Bay.

Portmarnock Golf Links

• Championship Course: Bernhard Langer (1995) 

18 holes - 6.195 m./76,780 yds - Par 71

The peninsula of Portmarnock is about two miles long and covers some 500 acres. It is links land at its best, with low sand dunes, small green hollows and long valleys. This ideal golfing terrain has been first used for the game as early as 1858 by the Jameson's, their private golf course running south from their home, now the Portmarnock Hotel, to the site of the present 15th green at Portmarnock Golf Club. 

It was followed in 1894 by George Ross & W.C. Pickeman layout at Portmarnock Golf Club and more recently the Links at Portmarnock, in 1995. Enjoying a growing international reputation, Bernard Langer's course is essentially fashioned from the same duneland as Portmarnock and an even tighter layout than its famous neighbour, with elevated greens, acutely angled doglegs and almost 100 strategically placed and beautifully designed bunkers.

Portmarnock Golf Club

• Championship Course : George Ross & W.C. Pickeman (1894) Links

18 holes - 6.656 m./7,283 yds - Par 72 - SSS 74

• Nine Hole Course : Frederic William Hawtree (1971) Links

9 holes - 3.460 m./3,785 yds - Par 37

In the shelterless surroundings of Portmarnock peninsula and surrounded by water on three sides, the original Championship course was laid out in a serpentine fashion, with no two successive holes playing in the same direction, thus demanding a continual discernment of wind direction. Sharing the same wild and impressive setting than its eldest neighbour, this nine holler was laid out in 1971 by Frederic Hawtree. It is a traditional links course, fully integrated in its natural and historical surroundings, forming a perfect complement to the Championship course.

 


Golf in Dublin

Golf in Dublin

Dublin's traditional links are grouped north of the city, where the sandy beach and duneland provide the prefect natural conditions for these kind of layouts. Portmarnock Links and Portmarnock Golf Club are complemented by Royal Dublin (1885), an island course by Harry S. Colt, and The Island (1890), drastically remodelled by Frederick Hawtree and Eddie Hackett.  

• Royal Dublin 

www.theroyaldublingolfclub.com

Harry S. Colt (1885) Links

The Dublin Golf Club was moved to its present situation, on Bull Island - in Dublin Bay, and received its Royal designation in 1891. Bull island is not actually an island, but a sandbank that filled in behind a sea wall built to protect the port of Dublin - it was built by none other than Captain William Bligh of HMS Bounty fame. Bligh had the 1.75 mile sea wall built from 1819 to 1823 and accidentally created the setting for one of Ireland's greatest course.  The course was restored after World War I by Harry S. Colt and has remained unchaged since and offers remarkable holes and a tough finish. A formidable challenge where accuracy is of greater need than length and where the wind can change the entire personality of the course from one day to another. 

• The Island 

www.theislandgolfclub.com

W.F. Hawtree & Eddie Hackett (1890) Links

Founded in 1890, The Island falls into that "must play" golf course category. It is a links, which has seldom been given the credit it undoubtedly deserves and may never be given that level of credit but this is one course that the links enthusiast must experience. Nobody knows just who designed the original layout back in 1890 but work was carried out by Fred Hawtree in the early 70's and by Eddie Hackett in the 80's. Over the years, seven new holes were blended into the best of the original layout and the course is now a test for the very best. The links itself requires excellent shot making skills and offers countless superb holes, incorporating some great natural dunes.

Dublin

Dublin

Portmarnock 

Portmarnock Beach with its wide sands witnessed the daring exploits of a number of pioneering aviators. James Mollison (husband of Amy Johnson) took off from Portmarnock Beach on the 18th August 1932 for what was acknowledged as the first solo east to west crossing of the Atlantic. Two years earlier, having stayed overnight at Jameson's house, the Australian Charles Kingsfor Smith took off for America on the "Southern Cross" from this same beach, with Irishman Captain Saul. North of the peninsula, well worth a visit is Malahide Town & Marina, Malahide Castle & Talbot Botanical Gardens, as well as The Ben of Howth hill range

Dublin

A short drive away, Ireland's capital awaits you. With a turbulent history behind it ever since the Vikings came to town, the laid-back Irish capital is a harmonious blend of Victorian bars, flat-fronted Georgian townhouses and glass-apartments in the renovated Docklands. Above them all looms the spindly Millennium Spire, better known as the 'Stiletto in the Ghetto' by witty Dubliners.

From the National Museum and its Iron Age 'bog bodies', stroll along graceful Georgian terraces around Merrion Square, past former homes of literary luminaries like Yeats, Joyce and Beckett. Nearby is Dublin Castle, which now houses the wooden table on which the Good Friday Agreement was signed. You'll find plenty of Dubliners welcoming sunny days on the flower-strewn St Stephen's Green, but don't miss the near-deserted Iveagh Gardens with ivy-clad statues and fountains. Take the short walk north over the River Liffey up mammoth O'Connell Street, to the bijoux Dublin City Gallery for Francis Bacon's chaotic recreated studio.

Address & Contact

Portmarnock Hotel & Golf Links

Strand Road

Portmarnock, Co. Dublin

Ireland

 

Portmarnock Golf Club

info@portmarnockgolfclub.ie

www.portmarnockgolfclub.ie

 

Location

Portmarnock Peninsula, 10 mi. N of Dublin 

Airport

Dublin International Airport, 6 mi.

Season

All year (Golf & Hotel)

Climate

Mild northern Atlantic influenced by the Gulf Stream